Tag Archives: etsy

Complements

Just in time for the holiday season, I am kicking off a new line of tops for spinning. Most folks dye their spinning fibers in about 100g or 3.5-4oz batches, myself included. While this is really great for small project like what I shared yesterday, I understand that sometimes 4 oz just isn’t enough.

That’s why I will introduce a new complementary set of hand painted tops every month. The two braids will make up at least 8 oz worth of fiber for spinning or felting, and while they are different colorways, they will be close enough that when used together, they will complement each other very well. The two braids will be listed separately, and can be purchased individually or together. However, if only one of the braids is sold, I will not be able to duplicate the colorway exactly, so I would get them both while you can!

November/December Complementary Hand Painted Top:


4 oz Falkland Top Hand Painted in December


5.3 oz Falkland Top Hand Painted in Winter Solstice

Happy Making!

Holiday Sale!

I realize my suede boots aren’t particularly festive, but that it is finally cold enough to wear them gets me into a holiday sort of mood. Plus, they are just really awesome boots. Last winter, all I needed were these tough guys and a pair of wool socks and I was ready to brave the 10 + inches of snow on the ground. (I did treat them, but as you can see some street salt still got to them.

Speaking of wool socks, and other woolens, I have a promotion running the weekend after Thanksgiving to kick off the holiday season. From 12:01am on Friday, November 25th through 11:59pm on Monday, November 28th, all items in the Tiny Dino Studios etsy shop will be 15% off with the coupon code BOOTS2011

I am working on some new hand knits and some really color saturated sock yarns for the winter season. They should be in the shop within the next few days. You should stop by and check them out!

Big Things Ahead

First, my show at the Handmade Market last week was awesome. For my first show, I don’t think it could have gone any better. I sold some things, met some new people and bought an awesome apron (pictures tomorrow) and just all around had a great time.

Handmade Market Booth

Handmade Market Booth: Show of Color

In other news, I and a group of like-minded fibery friends are working to a fiber arts collaborative off the ground. We are calling ourselves the Potwin Fiber Artisans. Our goal is start teaching some classes and raise some money to eventually be a destination for all things fibery in NE Kansas.

Our 2nd Annual Fiber Arts Bazaar is right around the corner, Nov. 4th and 5th at Potwin Presbyterian Church. I will be there selling my wares, as doing a demonstration on Armpit Knitting. As part of our fundraising effort, there will also be a silent auction which I know has handmade object ranging from scarves to quilts to handspun yarn and even a couple of special gift baskets. It should be a blast.

Information on classes will be coming out soon. In the meantime, we can be found on facebook and as @KEKSPFA on twitter.

Tomorrow!

Hand Knits in the Shop! (finally)

I know I have been teasing since May about working on some hand-knit items for the shop. I shouldn’t have, it was mean, I know. But I finally got some good photos of what I have been working on. This is just one of the items that is currently up in the shop. (And I do take custom orders!)

Hand-Spun! . . . and a whole lot more

055
200 yards worsted weight hand-spun wool

I am thrilled to announce that I am adding a line of hand-spun yarn to my etsy shop! The first addition is pictured above and more are on their way. I have been spinning all day long. I find the motion of spinning a deeply soothing exercise now that I have the hang of it. Because of that, I have been spending a lot of time at my wheel. So much time that there is no way I could ever knit all of the yarn I have been spinning. (Well, I probably could but I would really like to avoid having my apartment over flow with yarn the way cartoon laundry rooms do with soap suds.)

The summer is winding down. I have been finished with school for about three months now. Athrun started Kindergarten on Tuesday, and I have had zero luck finding a job outside the coffee shop, particularly a job I feel like I can really do well. This summer has been full of waffling back and forth on the issue: Do I find an office job that pays a little bit more and allows me to sleep like a regular human being or do I concentrate on growing my own business ventures and creating a job for myself? Do I find a job where I might have to cancel on Shephreding Camp (because did I mention I am going!) or do I stick with the coffee shop and work toward my goal of starting my own farm, possibly fiber csa, sometime within the next decade or do I go try my luck as an administrative assistant or a customer service rep?

To tell the truth, as ready as I am to be the coffee shop customer instead of the barista, I also want to have the opportunity to participate in 2012 season with Growing Growers so I can learn more about growing food out on my Future Fantasy Farm and meet the really great farmer’s who live in my area. I can’t tell you how drawn I am to the idea of participating in that program, but concerns about money kick in just like they always do. The basic concern being that I could really use some more of it. The temptation of money has pulled me back and forth over the past three months, but the strangest thing pointed me in what I feel is the right direction about two weeks ago. The complete lack of money for the right thing.

Not far from my apartment, there is a great shopping center which is mostly full of small, local businesses. One of these, a coffee shop that has always struggled (and was never open when I could go there, might I add) closed down. It’s a cute shop space, and if you’re from Topeka, you know which one I mean. It was all wood with big windows, a nice bar with a little seating downstairs, with a homey upstairs. I noticed the closed for good sign one morning on my way to work while filling up my gas tank. All I could think was “STUDIO SPACE!” and that’s pretty much all I thought the rest of the day.

The downstairs, with some renovation would make a really cute yarn shop, which Topeka is sorely lacking. And upstairs would be the perfect classroom space. You could hold small knitting/spinning classes and maybe even some dyeing lessons. It would small, cute, cozy, a gathering space even. Maybe I would keep the espresso machine. Everything a yarn shop should be. I could see it perfectly, but I knew the rent on that place would be more than I currently pay for where I am living, and nobody is giving out business loans–especially to a girl who already has a little debt and barely-above-minimum-wage job–but the motivating thought the past few weeks is that I can get there.

I don’t necessarily need the rented studio space, but it might be a stepping stone somewhere along the line. Right now I don’t really know. All I do know is that I am putting myself full-steam back into Tiny Dino Studios and going where it takes me. (I am hoping this means more blog posts as well as more products.)

I have some hand-knit samples worked up, but the photography hasn’t quite worked out yet. I almost feel like I need a dress form. But one, dress forms are expensive, two, most of the modern ones are ugly, so I would want to find a vintage one, which is probably even more expensive, and three, I have a very small apartment and finding a place for it might be a problem. All that aside, if you know of someone who has a nice vintage dress form along these lines, I would be happy to make them an offer.

Now, I am off to do some yoga, which is my other new project: losing all the weight I gained when I went back to school–which is a whole other blog post.

In Which I Make You Hungry

I have a conundrum. It turns out that two of my favorite past-times are vying for the same space. You all know about the dyeing thing. It’s all over this blog. The interesting thing is, that for dyeing one needs some counter space, a couple of pots, probably some aluminum foil and some plastic wrap, and a stove top. This is where the problem comes in. I am really starting to fall in love with cooking, which uses similar equipment. (Not the same equipment mind you. Never mix your dyeing and your cooking materials. Dyes are not meant to be eaten.) Since it could be hazardous, I never dye and cook at the same time, which means when it comes to a choice between having enough time to dye some more products or cook a delicious, from scratch meal, the cooking usually wins out.

Joining the CSA this year was completely worth the money. I love that I can go pick up fresh produce once a week, and that there is usually a vegetable I haven’t tried before. So far it had mostly been a new type of green. It was a banner year for greens, let me tell you. This week it was turnips. I don’t know how I made it to 26 without ever (knowingly) eating a turnip, but I did. I made a turnip and potato potage from this book

that turned out delicious. In fact, I plan on having the leftovers for lunch. I the Local Flavors book a lot. It is good for generating ideas for using what you have instead of going out and buying food to cook a specific recipe. Also, the recipes I have made so far kind of follow my general method of cooking, which is to throw vegetables in a pan with some other stuff and see what happens. I especially liked making my own broth (for “Elixir of Fresh Peas”) out of pea pods.

And because I apparently have a deep desire to watch things grow and grow quickly, I bought a sprouting jar and some sprouts. I have a bag full of broccoli sprouts I have been putting on everything. They are delicious, crunchy, and have more flavor than alfalfa sprouts. I have a mix of bean sprouts growing right now that are mostly lentils. Who knows what I am going to do with those, but they are pretty.

Another recipe I have been making a lot is the Master Bread Recipe from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. Of course, I use whole wheat flour, which is not what the recipe calls for, but it turns out just as good. In fact, I find using whole grain flours actually adds to the flavor. (You should probably add an extra 1/4 cup of water, however.) This dough recipe is super versatile. It not only makes the usual little peasant loaf, but it also makes a delicious pizza crust (which Athrun will eat). I even used it to make pita bread one night. Amazing.

Tonight I am using the last of our spinach pesto (made when we had CSA spinach coming out our ears) and goat cheese pizza with caramelized onions. It’s my new favorite thing, and it makes me kind of sad that spinach season is ending. However, I am sure it will be just as good with basil pesto come August.

In Shop News
I mentioned on my Facebook Group that I have been thinking of adding some hand-knit goods to my shop inventory. Of course, this means I have to make some hand-knit goods to put in my shop. I have a few ideas, but I am slightly hesitant about taking this step. I am not sure I want to become a production knitter. (Plus, I have some things I want to make for myself, and still owe Brock sweaters…) So, I have a couple of patterns I will be knitting up over the next few weeks, and I will post them as an experiment.

But first I need finish up all my super-secret birthday knitting, so I better get to work.